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12 Things To Avoid If You Want To Nail Your Phone Interview

Source | FastCompany : BY JULIA MALACOFF

12 Things To Avoid If You Want To Nail Your Phone Interview

These days, phone interviews are an unavoidable part of the job interview process, and for good reason: They save everyone involved time and effort. But that doesn’t mean that phoners require zero energy on the part of the candidate. Yes, you should spend more time preparing for an in-person interview, but many companies treat phone screens as the official first round of the hiring process. That means candidates are expected to go into them prepared with as much information about the company, position, and their own skills and strengths as possible.

We asked HR pros about their top phone interview pet peeves, and they had no shortage of advice to offer. Apparently, it’s quite easy to mess up your phone interview. But here’s the thing: It’s also not hard to come across well if you keep some key things in mind.

1. NEVER TAKE THE INTERVIEW SOMEWHERE NOISY

It might seem like common sense, but you’d be surprised what interviewers say they can hear in the background of their phone interviews–everything from barking dogs to screaming children. “Prepare for the interview by securing a quiet space in advance, even if it means escaping to your car parked in the garage,” advises Chere Taylor, founder of Fulcrum HR Consulting. “If you can lock your home office door, by all means do it. We’ve all been there and sometimes things just happen, but the more time spent anticipating what could go wrong, the better prepared and organized you will appear to the interviewer and the greater likelihood of success.” That doesn’t mean that if your washing machine beeps once in the background all hope is lost, but the more effort you put into being in a quiet place, the more focused you’ll be.

2. DON’T TALK ABOUT YOUR PERSONAL LIFE

…Unless you’re directly asked a question about what you like to do in your off-hours. “The point of a phone interview is to focus on getting to know a candidate’s professional experience and goals,” says Mckenzie Roark, campus talent specialist at Lithko Contracting. “A recruiter is trying to qualify them to see if they are the best fit for a role, and learning about their personal life doesn’t help. For example, when asked where you see yourself in five years, we don’t want to know that you hope to be married or that you want to buy a new house. That is nice but that isn’t relative to anything professional.”

Read On…

 

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