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How Neurons Form Long-Term Memories

Mouse study reveals how neurons reorganize following experiencing novel stimuli. The study reports a possible mechanism for memory consolidation and recall, shedding new light on the biological underpinnings for long-term memory

By | neurosciencenews.com

On a late summer day in 1953, a young man who would soon be known as patient H.M. underwent experimental surgery. In an attempt to treat his debilitating seizures, a surgeon removed portions of his brain, including part of a structure called the hippocampus. The seizures stopped.

Unfortunately, for patient H.M., so too did time. When he woke up after surgery, he could no longer form new long-term memories, despite retaining normal cognitive abilities, language and short-term working memory. Patient H.M.’s condition ultimately revealed that the brain’s ability to create long-term memories is a distinct process that depends on the hippocampus.

Scientists had discovered where memories are made. But how they are made remained unknown.

Now, neuroscientists at Harvard Medical School have taken a decisive step in the quest to understand the biology of long-term memory and find ways to intervene when memory deficits occur with age or disease.

Reporting in Nature on Dec. 9, they describe a newly identified mechanism that neurons in the adult mouse hippocampus use to regulate signals they receive from other neurons, in a process that appears critical for memory consolidation and recall.

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Source
neurosciencenews.com
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