Guest Contributor
Trending

SECRET SUCCESS TOOL: SELF-TALK AFFIRMATIONS

By | Diana Kawarsky

Begin challenging your own assumptions. Your assumptions are 
your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, 
or the light won’t come in. —Alan Alda 
 
We each have an internal dialogue, not a monologue. We manage to 
somehow speak to ourselves – go figure. And it is this internal dialogue 
where we tell ourselves how to best negotiate our feelings and reconcile 
them with our immediate environment. 
Notice that these are in the present tense. 
Most people simply do not take seriously how important it is to think about 
how one thinks. The quality of your thinking has a huge impact on the 
quality of your life, and if you choose to, you can strengthen your mental 
state through positive thinking and developing your self-talk skills. 
Your thinking affects the actions you take or do not take. You are what you 
think about most of the time. Think about that. There have been periods of 
my adult life when I have had my thinking hijacked by my own under-skill 
of managing my self-talk. I remember a time when I was living and 
working in Victoria, BC how I thought of nothing but how I missed my 
home in Toronto, how I missed a few select people who were back home, 
and how I wanted to return. I had limited understanding of my inner 
language. It was a foreign tongue to me most of the time. I had never 
thought about how I could choose what I was thinking about as a skill. In 
hindsight, I think I missed a great deal of actually living in Victoria because 
I was unable to leverage influence on my own thoughts. I was physically in 
the moment and mentally in the past. This went on for months before I had 
life shake it out of me by bringing a series of small crises to jerk my 
thinking into the present. 
Self-talk understanding is a technique I offer to many groups I work with 
under the umbrella of management skills or people-influencing skills. It 
asks you to imagine what another person’s self-talk may be. The challenge 
with this understanding is then to speak it, albeit tentatively out loud. This 
means you are putting language to what you are guessing may be the selftalk of your 
listener, and then speculating out loud as to what you think they 
are thinking. This is empathetic thinking; it is a stretch for many of us who 
spend more of our time thinking about what we will say next rather than 
listening to another person’s words let alone, not only listening, but trying to 
imagine what the thinking that is informing the other person’s words may 
be. Geez. I warned you, it is complicated, but well worth it. It is asking you 
to equip the other person’s point of view, not accept it or deny it. It is asking 
you to hear and validate the other’s perspective, perhaps before they have 
articulated it very well themselves. 
Self-Talk Exercises: 
1. Positive In and Positive Out. 
Try to use the same language on the inside as you do on the outside. This is 
much easier to write about than to do. Positive language frames our 
thinking and can create the platforms our thoughts use to establish our 
expectations. 
2. Affirmations and Confirmations. 
Positive thinking is not enough. It is the starting point of a re-orientation to 
the language that you think and ultimately that you choose to use to interact 
successfully with others. Creating your own tag lines of positive phrases and imagery 
can be how to take this to the next level. “I am good at …” Make sure you are in the 
present tense. Be clear and specific and then like the shampoo bottles say, repeat. 
3. Thought Pointing. 
Ever wonder why we don’t spend more time thinking about those things that may 
interest us like art, love or a special memory or person? This is a 
technique that allows you to direct your thinking and to luxuriate in a 
specific idea or image of your choice. No, it’s not “a happy place” although 
it could be. Instead, it is a choice of what you want to think about. You can 
develop an inventory of thoughts that you point to one spot, thing, or object 
that you enjoy. These thoughts are a convenient way to re-experience a 
memory, ignite your creativity about a current situation or challenge, or 
even to forecast and plan with relish. The pointed thoughts are how to 
consciously keep your thinking about your thinking at the forefront of your 
thinking! 
4. Increase Your Self-Awareness. 
Increase your self-awareness by getting involved in opportunities to know 
yourself better. What does this mean? It means taking that ½ day course on 
communication skills that your HR Dept. has arranged for your 
organization, even though you’re busy (who isn’t?) and despite you being 
pretty darn sure your communicate skills are just fine. 
5. Gratitude. 
It is easy to be grateful when there is plenty and not so when there is 
scarcity. The importance of your self-talk is never higher than when you 
feel un-ease. It’s in those situations like a job interview, or when you see a 
tractor trailer jackknife on the highway in the lane next to yours, that our 
deliberate self-talk will allow us to better frame the situation so we can see 
the opportunity for gratitude. Sometimes, I know it’s been this way for me 
more than once, you have to scrape the very bottom of the gratitude barrel 
to find it, but there is always some there. You just have to reach with your 
thoughts to find it. 

Author Bio:

Diana is President of The Soft Skills Group Inc.www.tssg.ca. She is a senior training & development 
professional 20 years of experience in delivery, design & consulting with Fortune 500 companies, 
Universities & Colleges in Canada, the USA, Asia and Europe. 
 
Diana teaches regularly at the Schulich Executive Education Centre (SEEC) of the York University where her 
feedback ranks her within the top 3% of all faculty.  
 
An energetic, results-oriented consultant, Diana takes great pride in influencing the human side of 
business. She has delivered training for banks, investment firms, law firms, and wealth management 
corporations. Diana has worked with organizations in many industries —including Finance, 
 
telecommunications, health care, manufacturing, transportation, natural resources, not-for-profit and 
governments and crown corporations. Her experience has breadth from working with a variety of 
professionals from new hires to seasoned executives, C Suite level; totaling over 25,000 clients to date. 
 
In 2016 Diana’s first book Soft Skills Volume 1, was published; a clever go-to resource for professionals to 
make thoughtful choices to improve themselves and set themselves up for success.  
 
In 2019 Diana’s first E-book The Soft Cs, was published; it delivers high impact content with a great sense of 
humour; providing the insights and tools that you need to put your best self forward

 

Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button