Abhijit BhaduriGuest Author

The new language of leadership

By Abhijit Bhaduri

Here was the CEO of a large IT Services company. He had created his account on Twitter and wanted to know how he could quickly get to be the next social media celebrity. He had sent out a circular to the entire organisation to announce his foray into the world of social media. His first announcement on social media A fortnight of goading and sending reminders had got him 37 followers. That was disappointing. Hence his office had reached out to me to see if I would come over to have a chat.

He explained to me that it was a business requirement to connect to his customers. He was curious to get started and had many questions. Would the twitter account help him grow his business? Would I run his twitter handle or would train his executive assistant instead to run the account?

In the analog world, business leaders appeared in the media occasionally. Their interactions were few and far in between. Their speech was crafted by someone else. The language was formal and “business-like”. The legal team and the PR team agonised over the drafts before it was released in the media. The PR team would ensure that the right publications carried the message. The digital media has changed all this and how.

The new language of leadership

The digital media has made every customer and every employee a media house. Everyone is freely airing their views about everything from politics to office gossip. People are impatient unafraid to ask questions to the high and mighty. They want instant responses. The leaders are not used to this landscape. Media was always meant to be a one-way street and suddenly head-on collisions have become the norm. Being spontaneous and quick-witted seems to have become part of the leader’s job description.

The internal social platforms of the organizations are being used like bulletin boards. Most communication lacks soul. The leaders behave like the religious gurus and politicians who appear on the balcony to wave at the fans who have assembled there. They smile, wave and disappear. There is no engagement. It is one-sided communication which is meant to convey intimacy, but doesn’t.

Read On….

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abhijitAbhijit Bhaduri works as the Chief Learning Officer for the Wipro group. He lives in Bangalore, India. Prior to this he led HR teams at Microsoft, PepsiCo, Colgate and Tata Steel and worked in India, SE Asia and US. He is on the Advisory Board of the prestigious program for Chief Learning Officers that is run by the Univ of Pennsylvania. Visit http://www.abhijitbhaduri.com/   and follow me on Twitter @AbhijitBhaduri

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