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Working harder from home: psychologists on why we’re spending longer at our desks during the global pandemic

Research shows that on average there seems to have been very little slacking — but how is working from home affecting our brains?

By | Kasia Delgado | inews.co.uk

Before the global pandemic, working from home evoked images of wearing pyjamas all day on the sofa, or perhaps downing a midday pint with a lavish lunch in front of Homes under the Hammer. In most companies, only a brave soul would ask their boss to work from home without a clear reason for doing it.

However, while the success of home-working since March has varied across different companies and organisations, research shows that on average there seems to have been very little slacking. In fact, people are spending 48.5 minutes more at their desk each day, according to a report published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Part of this is down to the fact that humans are creatures of habit, according to counselling psychologist Dr Jonathan Moult, who spent over twenty years as a lawyer in the City.

“People who committed an awful lot to their work in workplace before coronavirus upheaval will probably continue in much the same vein,” Moult explains. They may be commuting less, but this just gives them more time to crack on with work.

‘Humans are creatures of habit’ (Photo: Unsplash/Annie Spratt)
‘Humans are creatures of habit’ (Photo: Unsplash/Annie Spratt)

“I’ve noticed with the people I talk to that they’re finding it just as difficult to meet non-work commitments, finding it just as difficult to get away from work as ever they did. So although the context may have changed quite profoundly, perhaps people’s behaviours will be in that sense quite similar. They continue to ‘over work’.”

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Source
inews.co.uk
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